PitchFeast Indy

Kendrea Williams, PitchFeast CEO will be joining us this month to talk about entrepreneurship, and why she created PitchFeast.  We will also discuss the organization’s involvement with this year’s Lemonade Day Greater Indianapolis! PitchFeast is a 501(c)(3) public charity and crowdfunding dinner, which serves as an innovative fundraising program for small businesses, under-resourced entrepreneurs and creatives. It is a monthly community meal in which a ticket gives you now only food and fellowship, but also the opportunity to FUNdraise for a creative, Indianapolis idea. The next event, is February 27th, 6:30pm at The Speak Easy.  Click here to purchase tickets via the Givelify app.  Or click here to submit a proposal for your own pitch!  Find more PitchFeast Event dates on Meetup.com — featured image: pitchfeast.org

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Black Inventors throughout American History

Black Inventors through American History Below is a list of some of the greatest inventors in Black History. See full list here: Download PDF   George Alcorn Not many inventors have resumes as impressive as George Edward Alcorn’s. Among his credits, the African-American inventor received a B.A. in physics, a master’s degree in nuclear physics and a Ph.D in atomic and molecular physics. Despite such impressive credentials, Alcorn is probably most famous for his innovation of the imaging x-ray spectrometer. Benjamin Banneker In the Stevie Wonder song “Black Man,” the Motown marvel sings of Benjamin Banneker: “first clock to be made in America was created by a black man.” Though the song is a fitting salute to a great inventor (and African Americans in general), it only touches on the genius of Benjamin Banneker and the many hats he wore – as a farmer, mathematician, astronomer, author and land surveyor. Dr. Patricia Bath Imagine living in a world ranging from hazy, clouded vision to that of total darkness for 30 years. Before 1985, that was the plight of those with cataracts who did not want to risk surgery with a mechanical grinder. Now imagine sitting in a doctor’s office without […]

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Black History Month: William Trotter

Last night, PBS premiered the documentary Birth of a Movement, based on the book The Birth of a Movement: How Birth of a Nation Ignited the Battle for Civil Rights, by Dick Lehr.  Both chronicle the very public battle between activist and newspaper editor (The Boston Guardian)  William Monroe Trotter, and film pioneer D.W. Griffith (The Birth of a Nation). Trotter came from a well-to-do family, his father James Trotter being the first Black man to earn lieutenant rank in the 55th Regiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War.  James later became the first Black man in Boston employed with the U.S. Postal Service.  And appointed as Recorder of Deeds for Washington, D.C. by President Grover Cleveland.  Trotter’s mother Virginia Isaacs, was the great granddaughter of Elizabeth Hemings, mother of Sally Hemings (Monticello, Thomas Jefferson). William Trotter grew up in the predominantly white area of Hyde Park, where he graduated high school and went on to attend Harvard University, becoming the first Black man to graduate Phi Beta Kappa at the school. In 1895 he graduated with his bachelor’s – magna cum laude, and in 1896 with his master’s degree. With fellow Harvard intellectual W.E.B. Du Bois, Trotter founded The Niagara Movement, precursor to the NAACP […]

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